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BPJ @ AWP '21

Editor's Corner
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Join BPJ @ AWP '21. We're hosting readings, workshops and great opportunities to visit with us in our Virtual Booth. Click through for more information!

Submissions for 2021 Adrienne Rich Award for Poetry

Submission Calls
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The editors of the Beloit Poetry Journal are pleased to accept entries for the 2021 Adrienne Rich Award for Poetry. The award was established in 2017, with the support of the Adrienne Rich Literary Trust

This year’s final judge is Natasha Trethewey, who served two terms as the 19th Poet Laureate of the United States (2012-2014). She is the author of five collections of poetry, Monument (2018), which was longlisted for the 2018 National Book Award; Thrall (2012); Native Guard (2006), for which she was awarded the Pulitzer Prize, Bellocq’s Ophelia (2002); and Domestic Work (2000), which was selected by Rita Dove as the winner of the inaugural Cave Canem Poetry Prize for the best first book by an African American poet and won both the 2001 Mississippi Institute of Arts and Letters Book Prize and the 2001 Lillian Smith Award for Poetry. She is also the author of the memoir Memorial Drive (2020). Her book of nonfiction, Beyond Katrina: A Meditation on the Mississippi Gulf Coast, appeared in 2010. She is the recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Guggenheim Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation, the Beinecke Library at Yale, and the Bunting Fellowship Program of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard. At Northwestern University she is a Board of Trustees Professor of English in the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences. In 2012 she was named Poet Laureate of the State of Mississippi and and in 2013 she was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

All submissions will be considered for publication, and the winner will receive $1,500. Submissions will remain open through April 30. For more details, see our guidelines.

Katie Farris's A Net to Catch My Body in its Weaving Selected for the Chad Walsh Chapbook Series

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The editors of the Beloit Poetry Journal are delighted to announce that they have selected Katie Farris's A Net to Catch My Body in its Weaving for this year's title in the Chad Walsh Chapbook Series.

Katie Farris’s work has appeared in Poetry, The Nation, McSweeneys, Granta, and the Massachusetts Review, which awarded her the Anne Halley Poetry Prize. Farris is the author of the hybrid-form text boysgirls (Marick Press, 2011; Tupelo Press, 2019) and translator as well as co-editor of several books, including Gossip and Metaphysics: Russian Modernist Poems and Prose (Tupelo, 2014). She is currently Associate Professor of Creative Writing at Georgia Institute of Technology.

When you subscribe to the BPJ, you’ll receive as part of your subscription a copy of the forthcoming chapbook in the series. Subscribe now to receive A Net to Catch My Body in its Weaving due to ship in May, as your first issue. 

Our 2020 Pushcart Prize Nominations

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We are thrilled and honored to announce our 2020 Pushcart Prize nominations: Jubi Arriola-Headley, Athena Kildegaard, Cortney Lamar Charleston, Claire Wahmanholm, Lolita Stewart-White, Alicia Wright!

Submissions Open for Chad Walsh Chapbook Series

Submission Calls
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The editors of the Beloit Poetry Journal are pleased to accept entries for 2021 Chad Walsh Chapbook Series. The series was established in 2017, with the support of the Alison W. Sackett Trust, in honor of former editor Chad Walsh. 

The poet whose manuscript is selected for the series will receive $2,500 and 50 copies of the chapbook and in-depth editorial consultation. The winning chapbook will be distributed to every BPJ subscriber and sold separately, in a print run of approximately 1,500. Previous titles in the series include Jacques J. Rancourt's In the Time of PrEP, Christine Gosnay's The Wanderer and Victoria C. Flanagan's Glossary of Unsaid Terms.

We will remain open for submissions through November 30. For more details, see our guidelines.

Ellen Bass Selects Jude Nutter as Winner of 2020 Adrienne Rich Award

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The editors of the Beloit Poetry Journal are delighted to announce that final judge Ellen Bass has chosen Jude Nutter’s “Visible Woman, Visible Man” as the winner of the 2020 Adrienne Rich Award for Poetry.

Jude Nutter was born in North Yorkshire, England, and grew up in northern Germany. Her first collection, Pictures of the Afterlife (Salmon Poetry, Ireland) was published in 2002. The Curator of Silence (University of Notre Dame Press), her second collection, won the Ernest Sandeen Prize and was awarded the 2007 Minnesota Book Award in poetry. A third collection, I Wish I Had a Heart Like Yours, Walt Whitman (University of Notre Dame Press), was voted Poetry Book of the Year by ForeWord Review. In 2004-2005, she spent two months in Antarctica as part of the National Science Foundation’s Writers and Artists Program. Her forth collection, Dead Reckoning, will be published by Salmon Poetry, Ireland, in 2020. She divides her time between Minneapolis/St. Paul and Dingle, Ireland.

Of Nutter’s poem, Ellen Bass writes, “‘Visible Woman, Visible Man’ is a capacious, complex poem. Building on striking diction, fresh metaphors, and precise narration, the poet considers the human body and the whole of the physical world, reaching back and forward in time—an ambitious journey which she carries off with aplomb. Intellectually satisfying and emotionally moving, this is a poem which deepens with each successive reading.”

Along with naming the winner, Bass selected two finalists. Of Jubi Arriola-Headley’s “Superhero Origin Story [S.O.S.],” Bass writes, “It's not easy to write about a spiritual experience in a way that brings the reader along, but I'm carried, as this speaker is, right up into the joy!” Of Chelsea Whitton’s “A Few More Lines for the Torturer’s Horse,” Bass writes, “Evil and innocence are big concepts, but they are handled here with understated skill and grace.”

The editors also selected as semifinalists Amy Beeder’s “Big Fish Eat Little Fish,” Cortney Lamar Charleston’s “It’s Important I Remember that Politics Is a Contact Sport—,” Corey Oglesby’s “Ballistics,” Alicia Wright’s “From Grass to Grass,” and Linda Zisquit’s “War Sonata.” The winning poem, as well as the finalists and semifinalists, will appear in the Fall 2020 issue of the BPJ.

We’re grateful to the Adrienne Rich Literary Trust and to all who submitted poems for this year’s contest.